Justia North Carolina Supreme Court Opinion Summaries

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The Supreme Court affirmed the order of the trial court terminating Mother's parental rights, holding that there was no error or abuse of discretion.After a hearing, the trial court found that grounds existed to terminate Mother's parental rights based on neglect and a willful failure to pay a reasonable portion of the cost of care and that it was in the child's best interest to terminate Mother's parental rights. Mother appealed, and Mother's counsel filed a no-merit brief on her behalf. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding that the trial court's order terminating Mother's parental rights was supported by clear, cogent, and convincing evidence and based upon proper legal bounds. View "In re K.W." on Justia Law

Posted in: Family Law
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The Supreme Court affirmed the order of the circuit court terminating Mother's parental rights to her daughter, holding that there was no error or abuse of discretion.Following a hearing, the trial court entered an order terminating Mother's parental rights, concluding that grounds existed to terminate her parental rights based on the grounds of neglect and willful failure to make reasonable progress. See N.C. Gen. Stat. 1111(a)(1)-(2). The trial court further concluded that it would be in the child's best interests that Mother's parental rights be terminated. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding that the order terminating Mother's parental rights was supported by clear, cogent, and convincing evidence and was based on proper legal grounds. View "In re N.K." on Justia Law

Posted in: Family Law
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The Supreme Court affirmed the order of the trial court terminating Father's parental rights in his child, holding that there was no error or abuse of discretion.After a hearing, the trial court entered an order terminating Father's parental rights based on dependency and willful abandonment. See N.C. Gen. Stat. 1111(a)(6) and (7). The court further concluded that it was in the child's best interests that Father's parental rights be terminated. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding that the findings of fact supported the trial court's determination that grounds existed to terminate Father's parental rights in his child pursuant to N.C. Gen. Stat. 7B-1111(a)(7). View "In re A.A.M." on Justia Law

Posted in: Family Law
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The Supreme Court affirmed the order of the trial court terminating Father's parental rights to his minor child, holding that there was no error or abuse of discretion.After a hearing, the trial court terminated Father's parental rights to his child, finding that grounds existed pursuant to N.C. Gen. Stat. 7B-1111(a)(1), (2), and (7). Father appealed, and his counsel filed a no-merit brief on Father's behalf. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding that the trial court (1) did not err in determining that grounds existed to support the termination of Father's parental rights to his child; and (2) did not abuse its discretion in concluding that it would be in the child's best interests to terminate Father's parental rights. View "In re I.P." on Justia Law

Posted in: Family Law
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The Supreme Court affirmed the order of the trial court terminating Mother's parental rights in her three minor children, holding that the trial court did not err or abuse its discretion in terminating Mother's parental rights.After a hearing, the trial court entered an order terminating Mother's parental rights, concluding that grounds existed for termination under N.C. Gen. Stat. 7B-1111(a)(1), (2), and (3) and that terminating Mother's parental rights was in each of the children's best interests. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding that the trial court had sufficient evidence to support the conclusion that grounds existed pursuant to N.C. Gen. Stat. 7B-1111(a)(3) to terminate Mother's parental rights. View "In re J.K.F." on Justia Law

Posted in: Family Law
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The Supreme Court affirmed the order of the trial court terminating Mother's parental rights in her daughter, holding that there was no error or abuse of discretion.After a termination of parental rights proceeding, the trial court entered an order concluding that Mother's parental rights in her daughter were subject to termination on the basis of N.C. Gen. Stat. 7B-1111(a)(2) and (6) and that the termination of Mother's parental rights would be in the child's best interests. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding that the trial court did not err by finding that Mother's parental rights in the child were subject to termination under N.C. Gen. Stat. 7B-1111(a)(2). View "In re I.E.M." on Justia Law

Posted in: Family Law
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The Supreme Court affirmed the orders of the trial court terminating the parental rights of Father and Mother in their minor children J.V., E.V., and A.V. and terminating Mother's parental rights in her minor child A.E., holding that there was no error or abuse of discretion.After a hearing, which neither Mother nor Father attended, the trial court entered orders terminating the parents' parental rights in the children on grounds set forth in N.C. Gen. Stat. 7B-1111(a)(1), (5), and (6). The Supreme Court affirmed, holding (1) Father's challenges to the majority of the trial court's findings were unavailing; (2) the trial court did not err by concluding that Father's parental rights were subject to termination on the basis of neglect; and (3) the trial court did not err by concluding that Mother's parental rights were subject to termination on the basis of neglect. View "In re A.E." on Justia Law

Posted in: Family Law
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The Supreme Court affirmed the order of the trial court terminating the parental rights of Parents in their daughter, holding that there was no error or abuse of discretion.After a hearing, the trial court entered an order in which it found by clear, cogent, and convincing evidence that Parents' parental rights in their child were subject to termination pursuant to N.C. Gen. Stat. 7B-1111(a)(1), (2), and (3). The court further determined that the termination of Parents' parental rights would be in the child's best interests. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding that the trial court did not err in determining that Parents' parental rights in their child were subject to termination pursuant to N.C. Gen. Stat. 7B-1111(a)(3) and did not abuse its discretion in determining that termination of Parents' parental rights would be in the child's best interests. View "In re S.C.C." on Justia Law

Posted in: Family Law
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The Supreme Court affirmed the order of the trial court terminating Mother's parental rights in her four minor children, holding that there was no error or abuse of discretion.After a hearing, the trial court entered an order terminating Mother's parental rights pursuant to N.C. Gen. Stat. 7B-1111(a)(1), (3), (6), (7). The court further found that termination was in the best interests of the children. After Mother appealed, Mother's counsel filed a no-merit brief on her behalf. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding that the issues identified by Mother's appellate counsel as potentially supporting an award of relief from the trial court's termination order lacked merit. View "In re P.R.F." on Justia Law

Posted in: Family Law
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The Supreme Court affirmed the order of the trial court terminating Mother's parental rights in three of her children, holding that the trial court did not err or abuse its discretion.After a hearing, the trial court entered an order concluding that Mother's parental rights in her three children were subject to termination on the basis of N.C. Gen. Stat. 7B-1111(a)(1), (3), and (6). The trial court further concluded that the termination of Mother's parental rights would be in the children's best interests. Mother appealed, and her counsel filed a no-merit brief on Mother's behalf. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding that the issues identified by Mother's appellate counsel as arguably supporting an award of relief from the trial court's termination order lacked merit. View "In re C.M.F." on Justia Law

Posted in: Family Law